Finding Aids

Finding Aid

Example of a Finding Aid.

A finding aid is like a book jacket outlining an archivist's painstaking work organizing and describing historical records to let you know what is inside a collection. A finding aid serves two purposes: to provide context with the historical background of original materials, and to provide a table of contents for the collection.

What is a finding aid? A finding aid is a document that explains...

  • What is in the collection
  • Who created the collection
  • Who has owned the collection
  • How to use the collection
  • Where to look for materials within the collection

Finding Aid

For a detailed description of finding aids and how to use them, click here.


AJHS Finding Aids

P-214: Touro family (Newport, R.I.) Papers, late 1700s-1849 [Posted 2015-1-12]

The collection contains correspondence, personal, and business papers of the following members of the Touro family: Abraham (1777/78-1822), Judah (1775-1854), and Rebecca (1779-1833) Touro of Newport, Rhode Island. Documents include an insurance policy, correspondence, and wills.

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I-189: Jewish Peace Fellowship Records, 1942-2010 [Posted 2015-1-12]

The collection includes materials documenting the work of the Jewish Peace Fellowship in supporting Jewish resistance to conscription and subsequent draft, opposition to arms race, Israeli politics on the disputed territories, and American armed interventions and consists of by-laws, correspondence, financial statements, individual files of Jewish conscientious objectors, lists, membership information, manuscripts and other materials intended for publication in JFP’s publications, minutes, questionnaires, printed materials, such as mailings, leaflets, and magazines, and reports.

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P-990: Leon Kronish Papers, 1932-1997 [Posted 2015-2-3]

The Leon Kronish Papers incorporate the personal and professional papers of Rabbi Leon Kronish with the organizational records of Temple Beth Sholom in Miami Beach, Florida, where he served as spiritual leader for over fifty years. Included are sermons, correspondence, memorandums, newsletters, worship service manuals, programs, pamphlets, greeting cards, administrative records, financial records, notes, clippings, scrapbooks, photographs, and sound recordings.

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I-520: Hebrew National Orphan Home Alumni Association Records, undated, 1925-2010, 2014 (bulk 1957-1997) [Posted 2015-02-23]

The Hebrew National Orphan Home Alumni Association Records document the activities from the establishment of the association in 1925 until its demise 2011. The records consist primarily of the Association's newsletter, The Alumnus, programs of reunion events, meeting minutes of both the general meetings and the association advisory board, newspaper and magazine clippings, oral histories on audiocassettes and videotapes, alumni writings, scrapbooks, correspondence, and a few photographs.

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P-992: Meta Joy Jacoby Papers, 1983-1990 [Posted 2015-03-23]

Personal collection of Soviet Jewry Movement activist Meta Joy Jacoby who chaired the Soviet Jewry Committee of the Main Line Reform Temple, Beth Elohim in Wynnewood, PA. The Committee provided moral support to Soviet Jewish families through the mailing of letters and telegrams, placing phone calls, and sending Jewish cultural materials to the Soviet Union. Meta Joy Jacoby repeatedly traveled to the Soviet Union to meet with and deliver aid to the Refuseniks. The collection includes memos, correspondence, newsletters, brochures, and clippings.

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P-993: Barry Marks Papers, 1966, 1983-1987 [Posted 2015-03-23]

Personal papers of the Soviet Jewry Movement activist Rabbi Barry Marks, a spiritual leader of Temple Israel of Springfield, IL and a founder of the Greater Springfield Interfaith Association. The collection reflects Rabbi Marks' and the Springfield, IL Jewish community's involvement in the Soviet Jewry movement. The materials include clippings, correspondence, memoranda, newsletters, and speeches.

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P-996: Harold and Judith S. Einhorn Papers, 1964, 1973-1979 [Posted 2015-04-13]

Personal papers of Soviet Jewry Movement activists Harold and Judith S. Einhorn. Residents of Laverock, PA, husband and wife Harold and Judith S. Einhorn were among the pioneers of the grassroots Soviet Jewry movement. Harold Einhorn chaired the Temple Beth Tikvah Community Relations Committee and Judith S. Einhorn chaired the Soviet Jewry Committee at Congregation Adath Jeshurun.

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I-312: Grand Street Boys' Association Records, 1921-2014 [Posted 2015-04-13]

The Grand Street Boys' Association began in 1916 as a reunion of men who had grown up on or near Grand Street in the Lower East Side neighborhood of Manhattan and quickly grew into an active club, open to all men (and eventually women) regardless of religion, ethnicity, or social class. The Association promoted welfare projects, acts of fellowship and tolerance, scholarships, youth employment, war efforts, and the elimination of discrimination in sports, among other projects. The collection documents the activities of the Association, as well as the Grand Street Boys' Foundation, its financial arm established in 1945, and its Hobbycraft Program, a charitable program tasked with collecting and redistributing donated items to charitable and nonprofit organizations. Materials include administrative records, financial records, correspondence, minutes, membership records, newsletters, yearbooks, artifacts, and photographs.

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I-410 and I-410A: Union of Councils for Soviet Jews Records, undated, 1948, 1954, 1963-1965, 1967-2000 [Posted 2015-04-13]

The collection contains the records of the Union of Councils for Soviet Jews (UCSJ), an umbrella institution for approximately 50 grassroots organizations active in the movement to free Soviert Jews. The records documenting the UCSJ's operations, programs, and campaigns relate primarily to the 1980's, when the rescue movement reached its pinnacle of success and international attention, and to the 1990's, reflecting UCSJ's work on behalf of human rights after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The records include materials of UCSJ individual councils; materials by the Soviet Jewry Legal Advocacy Center, an affiliate of UCSJ; and a large volume of case files of Prisoners of Conscience, Refuseniks, and Soviet Jews who were allowed to emigrate to the West.

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P-554: Solender Family Papers, 1890-2003 [Posted 2015-04-28]

The Solender Family Papers document the professional achievements and to a lesser extent, the personal lives, of the members of the Solender family. The Solender family has been influential in the field of Jewish Communal Services since the 1930s. Family members that are most prominently represented in the collection include Samuel Solender (1890-1961), his son Sanford Solender (1914-2003), and his grandson Stephen Solender (1938- ).

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I-568: Congregation Ahabot Sholom Records, undated, 1982-2001 [Posted 2015-01-08]

Incorporated in 1901, Congregation Ahabat Sholom constructed a German Romanesque synagogue on Church Street, which was dedicated in 1905 during a ceremony lead by the congregation's first cantor, Benjamin Gordon. The congregation was one of Lynn’s several Jewish Orthodox congregations in the early 1900s. This collection contains administrative records, photographs, scrapbooks, and programmatic materials.

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P-519: Bromberg Family Papers, undated, circa 1886-1977 [Posted 2015-2-3]

The Bromberg Family papers relate primarily to the political and social activities of Edward J. Bromberg (a lawyer and politician and the first Jewish person elected to the Massachusetts State Senate) and some members of his family. A scrapbook contains items regarding Edward’s sons, Justine and Bertram, and his daughter, Pauline. Other Bromberg family members in the collection are Lev, Henrietta Livingston, Anna Insoft, and Alice Goldstein. The collection includes clippings, programs, and photographs.

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I-220 and I-220A: Combined Jewish Philanthropies (Boston, MA) Records, undated, 1865-1989 and undated, 1900-2006 [Posted 2015-2-3]

The Combined Jewish Philanthropies (CJP) of Boston, Massachusetts is the oldest federated Jewish philanthropy in the United States. The current incarnation of CJP was formed in 1960, when two separate federated philanthropies – the Combined Jewish Appeal and Associated Jewish Philanthropies – merged to create a single organization dedicated to serving the needs of Boston’s Jewish community. CJP’s records contain the history of several other organizations, from the forerunners of the current Federation to the Jewish institutions supported by CJP. Their beginnings can be traced to the founding of the United Hebrew Benevolent Association (UHBA) in 1864 at the Pleasant Street Synagogue (now Temple Israel). This collection contains meeting minutes, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, financial documents and ledgers, appeal information, publicity, programs, brochures and other written documents relating CJP’s history.

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I-317: Jewish Community Center (Fitchburg, Mass.) Records, 1947-1955, 1959-1964 [Posted 2015-2-9]

The Jewish Community Center of Fitchburg, Massachusetts was founded in 1947. Not much else is known about the Center. This collection contains Bulletins from the founding of the Center to 1964.

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P-157: Rabbi Ber Boruchoff Papers, undated, 1906-1939; [Posted 2015-03-42]

Rabbi Ber Boruchoff was the first and longest serving rabbi for Congregation Beth Israel in Malden, Massachusetts. This collection contains ledgers with records of marriages performed in the Greater Boston area during the years 1906-1938, as well as some photographs and biographical information.

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I-571: United Order of True Sisters, Heritage #53 Records, 1948, 1990-2005 [Posted 2015-04-28]

Founded in 1846, the United Order of True Sisters originated in New York with the intent of increasing philanthropy and providing an outlet for women. In 1947, the United Order of True Sisters Cancer Services was founded to raise funds to support oncology centers. The material in this collection includes event programs, a certificate of life membership, and the correspondence of Sylvia Shapiro, vice-president of the UOTS.

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I-572: Jewish Federation of the North Shore Records, undated, circa 1926-2007 [Posted 2015-05-04]

The Jewish Federation of the North Shore was founded in 1938 in Lynn, Massachusetts with the objective to support organizations that helped enrich the Jewish community on the North Shore and abroad. After a period of declining donations and to consolidate services, the JFNS Board of Directors voted to merge the organization with the Combined Jewish Philanthropies in 2013. The collection contains correspondence, newspaper clippings and publications from JFNS, as well as a large group of photographs and documents produced for the Board of Directors in the early 21st century.

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P-995: Cantor Morton Shanok Papers, undated, circa 1943-2002 [Posted 2015-05-04]

Morton Shanok was Cantor at Temple Beth El in Lynn (and later Swampscott) for thirty-two years and, after his retirement, High Holiday Cantor at Temple B’nai Abraham and Religious Cultural Coordinator at the Jewish Rehabilitation Center for Aged. He served in the U.S. Army as assistant army chaplain from 1942-1945. He was a founding member of the Cantors Assembly and helped write the curriculum at the H.L. Miller Cantorial School and College of Jewish Music of the Jewish Theological Seminary. The material in the collection consists of photographs, correspondence, and documents primarily related to music and Cantor Shanok’s position at Temple Beth El.

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I-573: Temple B'nai Abraham Records, undated, circa 1925-2008 [Posted 2015-05-13]

Temple B’nai Abraham is a Conservative congregation, originally founded in Beverly, Massachusetts in 1908 as the Sons of Abraham. The Hebrew Community Center was annexed to the synagogue in 1930 and incorporated social groups, such as the Sisterhood and the Beverly Lodge of B’nai B’rith. The congregation expanded to a new location in 1962 and officially changed their name to Temple B’nai Abraham. The collection was formed by a former president of the Sisterhood and contains Temple B’nai Abraham programs and announcements, Sisterhood newsletters, and photographs.

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I-575: Jewish Rehabilitation Center for Aged of the North Shore Records, undated, circa 1961-2004 [Posted 2015-05-20]

The Jewish Rehabilitation Center for Aged of the North Shore (JRC) was founded in 1945 as a convalescent home for the elderly in the North Shore Jewish community. Over the years, the organization expanded and became a permanent residence for the elderly, and with the opening of its assisted living facility in Peabody, the JRC became the largest not-for-profit home for the elderly on the North Shore. The collection contains programs for meetings and events, as well as a small group of photographs and newspaper clippings.

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